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Screen relations : the limits of computer-mediated psychoanalysis and psychotherapy / by Gillian Isaacs Russell.

By: Isaacs Russell, Gillian [author.].
Publisher: Boca Raton, FL : Routledge, an imprint of Taylor and Francis, [2018]; ©2015Description: 1 online resource (224 pages).ISBN: 9781782201441 (pbk); 9780429932991 (e-book).Subject(s): Psychoanalysis -- Methodology | Psychoanalysis -- Technological innovations | Psychotherapy -- Methodology | Psychotherapy -- Technological innovations | HEALTH & FITNESS -- Diseases -- General | MEDICAL -- Clinical Medicine | MEDICAL -- Diseases | MEDICAL -- Evidence-Based Medicine | MEDICAL -- Internal MedicineAdditional physical formats: Print version: : No titleDDC classification: 616.8917 Online resources: Available via Taylor & Francis ebooks - Free to download and keep! Shibboleth login required
Contents:
part PART I ON THE FRONTIERS -- chapter 1 The western frontier -- chapter 2 Exploring the speculative non-fiction digital frontier -- chapter 3 Mapping the digital frontier -- part PART II IN THE CONSULTING ROOM AND THE RESEARCH LABORATORY -- chapter 4 What happens in the consulting room -- chapter 5 From the first laboratory: neuroscience connections -- chapter 6 From the second laboratory: technologically mediated communication -- part PART III ON THE SCREEN -- chapter 7 The mediating device -- chapter 8 The problem of presence -- part PART IV MAKING A PLACE FOR SCREEN RELATIONS -- chapter 9 Sometimes it works. -- chapter 10 The elephant in the room -- chapter 11 The toothpaste and the tube -- chapter 12 To be in the presence of someone.
Abstract: Increased worldwide mobility and easy access to technology means that the use of technological mediation for treatment is being adopted rapidly and uncritically by psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychotherapists. Despite claims of functional equivalence between mediated and co-present treatments, there is scant research evidence to advance these assertions. Can an effective therapeutic process occur without physical co-presence? What happens to screen-bound treatment when, as a patient said, there is no potential to "kiss or kick?" Our most intimate relationships, including that of analyst and patient, rely on a significant implicit non-verbal component carrying equal or possibly more weight than the explicit verbal component. How is this finely-nuanced interchange affected by technologically-mediated communication? This book draws on the fields of neuroscience, communication studies, infant observation, cognitive science and human/computer interaction to explore these questions. It finds common ground where these disparate disciplines intersect with psychoanalysis in their definitions of a sense of presence, upon which the sense of self and the experience of the other depends.
List(s) this item appears in: Online therapy and supervision e-books | Mental Health Awareness Week 2020
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode Item holds
E-BOOK E-BOOK Tavistock and Portman Library
electronic full-text resource
Taylor and Francis eBooks E-BOOK (Browse shelf) Not for loan Shibboleth login - Free to download and keep
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part PART I ON THE FRONTIERS -- chapter 1 The western frontier -- chapter 2 Exploring the speculative non-fiction digital frontier -- chapter 3 Mapping the digital frontier -- part PART II IN THE CONSULTING ROOM AND THE RESEARCH LABORATORY -- chapter 4 What happens in the consulting room -- chapter 5 From the first laboratory: neuroscience connections -- chapter 6 From the second laboratory: technologically mediated communication -- part PART III ON THE SCREEN -- chapter 7 The mediating device -- chapter 8 The problem of presence -- part PART IV MAKING A PLACE FOR SCREEN RELATIONS -- chapter 9 Sometimes it works. -- chapter 10 The elephant in the room -- chapter 11 The toothpaste and the tube -- chapter 12 To be in the presence of someone.

Increased worldwide mobility and easy access to technology means that the use of technological mediation for treatment is being adopted rapidly and uncritically by psychoanalysts and psychoanalytic psychotherapists. Despite claims of functional equivalence between mediated and co-present treatments, there is scant research evidence to advance these assertions. Can an effective therapeutic process occur without physical co-presence? What happens to screen-bound treatment when, as a patient said, there is no potential to "kiss or kick?" Our most intimate relationships, including that of analyst and patient, rely on a significant implicit non-verbal component carrying equal or possibly more weight than the explicit verbal component. How is this finely-nuanced interchange affected by technologically-mediated communication? This book draws on the fields of neuroscience, communication studies, infant observation, cognitive science and human/computer interaction to explore these questions. It finds common ground where these disparate disciplines intersect with psychoanalysis in their definitions of a sense of presence, upon which the sense of self and the experience of the other depends.

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