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Human development and learning : an interpretive introduction to psychology / Frank Seely Salisbury.

By: Salisbury, Frank Seely [author.].
Publisher: New York : McGraw-Hill, 1939Edition: 1st edition.Description: xvii, 513 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceSubject(s): Psychology | Learning, Psychology of | Psychology | Psychology, EducationalAdditional physical formats: OriginalOnline resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.
Contents:
Introduction -- We live and learn -- Human development before birth -- How is behavior controlled? -- Relations with environment -- Emotional behavior -- Development of intelligent behavior and conscious experience -- Organization in learning and in conscious experience -- The thought processes -- Conservation of experience -- Thinking and learning take direction -- Factors that influence learning -- The inheritance of individuality -- Interpreting individual differences -- Emotional control and social behavior -- Personality -- Esthetic experience and the creative life -- The larger view.
Summary: "The purpose of this book is to give the beginning student an interpretation of human nature that he can understand and use. In present-day psychology, and in other sciences, there is perhaps no tendency more significant than the way in which theory is related to practice. The man on the street is aware of this characteristic of modern science, and the beginning student of psychology enters upon his study expecting that his new knowledge will help him understand his personal problems and further his vocational ambitions. The beginning student in the field knows a good deal about human nature, he uses many psychological terms--with more or less accuracy--and he looks forward to more insight in his relations with fellow beings and with himself. Such expectancy is a stimulating challenge to this most human of sciences; it calls for a selection, an organization, and a well-grounded interpretation of a vast array of fact and theory, an interpretation that is intellectually satisfying and that can be put to work in the immediate affairs of life. The author in accepting this challenge has been mindful of the current attempts to find common ground in the apparently conflicting schools of psychology, and he has felt free to select materials and place emphasis in ways that seem best suited to the practical purposes of this book"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- We live and learn -- Human development before birth -- How is behavior controlled? -- Relations with environment -- Emotional behavior -- Development of intelligent behavior and conscious experience -- Organization in learning and in conscious experience -- The thought processes -- Conservation of experience -- Thinking and learning take direction -- Factors that influence learning -- The inheritance of individuality -- Interpreting individual differences -- Emotional control and social behavior -- Personality -- Esthetic experience and the creative life -- The larger view.

"The purpose of this book is to give the beginning student an interpretation of human nature that he can understand and use. In present-day psychology, and in other sciences, there is perhaps no tendency more significant than the way in which theory is related to practice. The man on the street is aware of this characteristic of modern science, and the beginning student of psychology enters upon his study expecting that his new knowledge will help him understand his personal problems and further his vocational ambitions. The beginning student in the field knows a good deal about human nature, he uses many psychological terms--with more or less accuracy--and he looks forward to more insight in his relations with fellow beings and with himself. Such expectancy is a stimulating challenge to this most human of sciences; it calls for a selection, an organization, and a well-grounded interpretation of a vast array of fact and theory, an interpretation that is intellectually satisfying and that can be put to work in the immediate affairs of life. The author in accepting this challenge has been mindful of the current attempts to find common ground in the apparently conflicting schools of psychology, and he has felt free to select materials and place emphasis in ways that seem best suited to the practical purposes of this book"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2015. Available via World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2015 dcunns

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