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Therapy through interview [electronic resource] / Stanley Guy Law.

By: Law, Stanley Guy, 1902-.
Series: McGraw-Hill series in health science: Publisher: New York : McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1948Edition: 1st ed.Description: xiii, 312 p. ; 21 cm.Subject(s): Psychiatry -- Popular works | Psychotherapy | Psychiatry | PsychotherapyAdditional physical formats: OriginalDDC classification: 616.8 Online resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.Summary: "This book was written with a desire to aid physicians who find a need for psychotherapy in their practice. It was written especially for the general practitioner, but specialists may find it useful. Psychotherapy includes many highly specialized methods of treatment. This book deals only with interview techniques. Gradually, during twelve years of general practice, the author came to realize the need for interviewing skill in his daily work. He directed his reading into the field of psychiatry and learned much about the diagnosis of personality disorders. Although he was able to trace historically the concepts of psychiatry from Freud to the modern writers, he was unable to find exact information on how to listen and talk to patients. He struggled to attain this skill during three and one-half years as a civilian specialist. The vague concepts of how to interview have finally begun to crystallize. He hopes to pass on to interested colleagues the result of this struggle, thereby saving them time and discouragement. The reader need not fear that the language found here will / be beyond his scope. The vocabulary does not include terminology peculiar to psychiatry. In dealing with patients, one must, for the most part, use words of one syllable. If psychiatry could not be written in everyday language, this work would never be completed. An understanding of the psychoses has been useful to the author in developing his philosophy and in studying and classifying personalities. No other field of medicine is as individualized as psychiatry. Each physician must fit his methods to his own personality. Yet certain basic principles do apply and can be used by all with only minor changes. The reader should constantly keep in mind, however, that the author's words can never be his. They reflect only a single personality"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 306-307) and index.

"This book was written with a desire to aid physicians who find a need for psychotherapy in their practice. It was written especially for the general practitioner, but specialists may find it useful. Psychotherapy includes many highly specialized methods of treatment. This book deals only with interview techniques. Gradually, during twelve years of general practice, the author came to realize the need for interviewing skill in his daily work. He directed his reading into the field of psychiatry and learned much about the diagnosis of personality disorders. Although he was able to trace historically the concepts of psychiatry from Freud to the modern writers, he was unable to find exact information on how to listen and talk to patients. He struggled to attain this skill during three and one-half years as a civilian specialist. The vague concepts of how to interview have finally begun to crystallize. He hopes to pass on to interested colleagues the result of this struggle, thereby saving them time and discouragement. The reader need not fear that the language found here will / be beyond his scope. The vocabulary does not include terminology peculiar to psychiatry. In dealing with patients, one must, for the most part, use words of one syllable. If psychiatry could not be written in everyday language, this work would never be completed. An understanding of the psychoses has been useful to the author in developing his philosophy and in studying and classifying personalities. No other field of medicine is as individualized as psychiatry. Each physician must fit his methods to his own personality. Yet certain basic principles do apply and can be used by all with only minor changes. The reader should constantly keep in mind, however, that the author's words can never be his. They reflect only a single personality"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2014. Available via World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2014 dcunns

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