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The sensitive child [electronic resource] : as revealed in some talks with a little boy / by Kate Whiting Patch.

By: Patch, Kate Whiting, 1870-1909.
Publisher: New York : Moffat, Yard & Co., 1910Description: vii, 93 p. ; 19 cm.Subject(s): Child rearing | Child RearingAdditional physical formats: OriginalOnline resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.Summary: "In this day and generation we are all familiar with the sensitive child. By the term sensitive I am not using a polite synonym for the homely phrase "touchy." The sensitive child may indeed be easily hurt by slights, real or imagined, but he is quite as likely to be unconscious of them. The phrase, as I would apply it, describes a little being almost abnormally alive to the world about him. He is sensitive to light and air; to atmospheric changes; to music or noises. He is particularly sensitive to people; he is quite likely to be timid, to have "notions," to be easily thrown into "tantrums" or "temper fits," and quite as easily brought out of them. He responds readily to genuine affection and sympathy, but shrinks from harshness. He may meet physical suffering with surprising courage, yet be unable to face a wound of the inner nature unflinchingly. His eyes will perhaps close before a reproachful glance, his hands cover his ears to shut out words of reproof or some dreaded bit of news. Through injudicious harshness he is easily made deceitful, though far more ready to meet us openly, and he is often painfully eager to do the right thing. Indeed, a misunderstanding of his motives will often cause some hasty or disagreeable demonstration on his part, which is really but a mask for the sudden pain of hurt feelings. The excess of emotion must find an outlet, and rather than reveal the real hurt he "flies off at a tangent," scarce knowing himself what he is about. In short, he is a difficult little creature to understand and to live with, and from lack of careful handling may grow into an imperative nervous" grown-up full of whims, or, worse still, a morbid, moody soul, with no eyes for the joy and sunshine. No doubt sensitive children have existed in all ages but I am inclined to believe that this hurrying world of today is very full of them. Although the children of this generation and those of the age to which we ourselves belonged are naturally the only ones with whom we have become intimately acquainted, there is no need for ignorance as to conditions in the past. The modern mother, if she be a thoughtful one, cannot but feel that she is facing a far different proposition from the one which confronted her grandmother when that dear lady set about the rearing of her "good old-fashioned family." The world knew then parents with steady nerves and histories of simple, unhurried lives; quiet, country homes; unexciting pleasures; busy days but long nights; few diversions and much outward peace, at least. What wonder, most children then thrived and knew not nerves or tantrums nor even bad manners! The following Talks with a Little Boy seek to reveal how one sensitive child and his mother met some of life's wonder-moments together"--Introduction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
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"Originally published in the Kindergarten review."

"In this day and generation we are all familiar with the sensitive child. By the term sensitive I am not using a polite synonym for the homely phrase "touchy." The sensitive child may indeed be easily hurt by slights, real or imagined, but he is quite as likely to be unconscious of them. The phrase, as I would apply it, describes a little being almost abnormally alive to the world about him. He is sensitive to light and air; to atmospheric changes; to music or noises. He is particularly sensitive to people; he is quite likely to be timid, to have "notions," to be easily thrown into "tantrums" or "temper fits," and quite as easily brought out of them. He responds readily to genuine affection and sympathy, but shrinks from harshness. He may meet physical suffering with surprising courage, yet be unable to face a wound of the inner nature unflinchingly. His eyes will perhaps close before a reproachful glance, his hands cover his ears to shut out words of reproof or some dreaded bit of news. Through injudicious harshness he is easily made deceitful, though far more ready to meet us openly, and he is often painfully eager to do the right thing. Indeed, a misunderstanding of his motives will often cause some hasty or disagreeable demonstration on his part, which is really but a mask for the sudden pain of hurt feelings. The excess of emotion must find an outlet, and rather than reveal the real hurt he "flies off at a tangent," scarce knowing himself what he is about. In short, he is a difficult little creature to understand and to live with, and from lack of careful handling may grow into an imperative nervous" grown-up full of whims, or, worse still, a morbid, moody soul, with no eyes for the joy and sunshine. No doubt sensitive children have existed in all ages but I am inclined to believe that this hurrying world of today is very full of them. Although the children of this generation and those of the age to which we ourselves belonged are naturally the only ones with whom we have become intimately acquainted, there is no need for ignorance as to conditions in the past. The modern mother, if she be a thoughtful one, cannot but feel that she is facing a far different proposition from the one which confronted her grandmother when that dear lady set about the rearing of her "good old-fashioned family." The world knew then parents with steady nerves and histories of simple, unhurried lives; quiet, country homes; unexciting pleasures; busy days but long nights; few diversions and much outward peace, at least. What wonder, most children then thrived and knew not nerves or tantrums nor even bad manners! The following Talks with a Little Boy seek to reveal how one sensitive child and his mother met some of life's wonder-moments together"--Introduction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2014. Available via World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2014 dcunns

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