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Premature termination in psychotherapy [electronic resource] : strategies for engaging clients and improving outcomes / by Joshua K. Swift and Roger P. Greenberg.

By: Swift, Joshua K.
Contributor(s): Greenberg, Roger P.
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2015Edition: 1st ed.Description: viii, 212 p. ; cm.ISBN: 9781433818011 (hardcover); 1433818019 (hardcover); 1433818027 (electronic bk.); 9781433818028 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Patient Dropouts -- psychology | Psychotherapy -- methods | Treatment Refusal -- psychology | Professional-Patient Relations | Patient refusal of treatment | Psychotherapy -- Methodology | Patients -- PsychologyAdditional physical formats: OriginalDDC classification: 616.89/14 Online resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.
Contents:
What is premature discontinuation and why does it occur -- Predictors of premature discontinuation in psychotherapy -- Provide role induction -- Incorporate preferences into the treatment decision-making process -- Assist in planning for appropriate termination -- Provide education about patterns of change in psychotherapy -- Strengthen early hope -- Enhance motivation for treatment -- Foster the therapeutic alliance -- Assess and discuss treatment progress -- Conclusions and future directions.
Summary: "Premature termination is a significant yet often neglected problem in psychotherapy with significant consequences for clients and therapists alike. According to some estimates, as many as 20% of adult clients terminate psychotherapy prematurely. Even experienced practitioners using the best evidence-based techniques cannot successfully promote positive, long-term change in clients who do not complete the full course of treatment. This book helps therapists and clinical researchers identify the common factors that lead to premature termination, and it presents eight strategies to address these factors and reduce client dropout rates. Such evidence-based techniques will help therapists establish proper roles and behaviors, work with client preferences, educate clients on patterns of change, and plan for appropriate termination within the first few sessions. Additional strategies can be used throughout therapy to help strengthen and reinforce clients' feelings of hope, enhance their motivation to create change, develop and maintain the therapeutic alliance, and continually evaluate overall treatment progress. Case examples demonstrate how these strategies can be employed in real-life scenarios"--Publicity materials. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode Item holds
E-BOOK E-BOOK Tavistock and Portman Library
electronic full-text resource
Psycbooks via EBSCOhost E-BOOK (Browse shelf) Not for loan Shibboleth login
Total holds: 0

Includes bibliographical references and index.

What is premature discontinuation and why does it occur -- Predictors of premature discontinuation in psychotherapy -- Provide role induction -- Incorporate preferences into the treatment decision-making process -- Assist in planning for appropriate termination -- Provide education about patterns of change in psychotherapy -- Strengthen early hope -- Enhance motivation for treatment -- Foster the therapeutic alliance -- Assess and discuss treatment progress -- Conclusions and future directions.

"Premature termination is a significant yet often neglected problem in psychotherapy with significant consequences for clients and therapists alike. According to some estimates, as many as 20% of adult clients terminate psychotherapy prematurely. Even experienced practitioners using the best evidence-based techniques cannot successfully promote positive, long-term change in clients who do not complete the full course of treatment. This book helps therapists and clinical researchers identify the common factors that lead to premature termination, and it presents eight strategies to address these factors and reduce client dropout rates. Such evidence-based techniques will help therapists establish proper roles and behaviors, work with client preferences, educate clients on patterns of change, and plan for appropriate termination within the first few sessions. Additional strategies can be used throughout therapy to help strengthen and reinforce clients' feelings of hope, enhance their motivation to create change, develop and maintain the therapeutic alliance, and continually evaluate overall treatment progress. Case examples demonstrate how these strategies can be employed in real-life scenarios"--Publicity materials. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2014. Available via World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2014 dcunns

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