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Toward better personal adjustment [electronic resource] / Harold W. Bernard.

By: Bernard, Harold W. (Harold Wright), 1908-.
Publisher: New York : McGraw-Hill, 1957Edition: 2nd ed.Description: vii, 454 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.Subject(s): Mental health | Mental HealthAdditional physical formats: No titleDDC classification: 131.3 Online resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.Summary: "In this book emphasis is placed on continuously improving adjustment even for those who are getting along acceptably. Common errors and shortcomings of normal persons are considered along with the more serious deviations of those considered to be abnormal. Elimination of the common errors can enhance self-realization, and knowledge of the more serious "adjustive" techniques can help one avoid danger zones. It is assumed that happy, efficient persons are as capable of improving adjustment as are those who stumble along. The treatment is based on the assumptions (1) that growth is continuous for all persons and that direction of growth trends is possible; (2) that habits shape patterns of adjustment but that the re-formation of habits can be controlled; and (3) that one needs clear, even if tentative, goals to direct the course of his life. Better mental health depends on the application of basic principles of psychology. This emphasis on application may be summarized as follows: When a person realizes and puts into action the knowledge that efficient living is the result of steadfast study, work, and habit formation, he has moved closer to the goal of better personal adjustment. The material of the second edition has been expanded in scope without enlarging the volume. New chapters on marital and occupational adjustments have been added--space for these having been provided by condensation of first-edition chapters on thinking and social adaptation. All chapters have been rewritten, thus giving room for the introduction of additional information. Data on accident-proneness, note making, social structure, implications of military service, and the impact of automation, which were lacking in the first edition, are now included. The uniqueness of the volume lies in the emphasis. While most books on mental hygiene and psychology are addressed to professional workers--teachers, counselors, clinicians, etc.--this one emphasizes the needs of the individual. However, the effectiveness of both professionals and laymen is largely dependent upon their own mental health. Most of the book deals, therefore, with normal persons, but abnormalities receive mention for the sake of understanding and as indications of danger zones of adjustment. Causative factors of maladjustment are described, but major stress is placed upon the individual's reactions to potentially frustrating conditions. In general, the book deals with psychological principles underlying preservative and preventive mental hygiene. It is to be hoped that the application of these principles will play a small part in the reduction of maladjustment and the enhancement of self-fulfillment. The pervasive aim is to help in the achievement of "a way of life that shall enable every person to live a happier, fuller, more harmonious, and more effective existence"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

"In this book emphasis is placed on continuously improving adjustment even for those who are getting along acceptably. Common errors and shortcomings of normal persons are considered along with the more serious deviations of those considered to be abnormal. Elimination of the common errors can enhance self-realization, and knowledge of the more serious "adjustive" techniques can help one avoid danger zones. It is assumed that happy, efficient persons are as capable of improving adjustment as are those who stumble along. The treatment is based on the assumptions (1) that growth is continuous for all persons and that direction of growth trends is possible; (2) that habits shape patterns of adjustment but that the re-formation of habits can be controlled; and (3) that one needs clear, even if tentative, goals to direct the course of his life. Better mental health depends on the application of basic principles of psychology. This emphasis on application may be summarized as follows: When a person realizes and puts into action the knowledge that efficient living is the result of steadfast study, work, and habit formation, he has moved closer to the goal of better personal adjustment. The material of the second edition has been expanded in scope without enlarging the volume. New chapters on marital and occupational adjustments have been added--space for these having been provided by condensation of first-edition chapters on thinking and social adaptation. All chapters have been rewritten, thus giving room for the introduction of additional information. Data on accident-proneness, note making, social structure, implications of military service, and the impact of automation, which were lacking in the first edition, are now included. The uniqueness of the volume lies in the emphasis. While most books on mental hygiene and psychology are addressed to professional workers--teachers, counselors, clinicians, etc.--this one emphasizes the needs of the individual. However, the effectiveness of both professionals and laymen is largely dependent upon their own mental health. Most of the book deals, therefore, with normal persons, but abnormalities receive mention for the sake of understanding and as indications of danger zones of adjustment. Causative factors of maladjustment are described, but major stress is placed upon the individual's reactions to potentially frustrating conditions. In general, the book deals with psychological principles underlying preservative and preventive mental hygiene. It is to be hoped that the application of these principles will play a small part in the reduction of maladjustment and the enhancement of self-fulfillment. The pervasive aim is to help in the achievement of "a way of life that shall enable every person to live a happier, fuller, more harmonious, and more effective existence"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2014. Available via World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2014 dcunns

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