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The science of musical sounds [electronic resource] / by Dayton Clarence Miller.

By: Miller, Dayton Clarence, 1866-1941.
Series: Lowell Institute lectures: Publisher: New York : Macmillan, 1922Edition: [2nd ed.].Description: viii, 286 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.Subject(s): Sound | Music -- Acoustics and physics | Sound | MusicAdditional physical formats: No titleOnline resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.Summary: "A series of eight lectures was given at the Lowell Institute in January and February, 1914, under the general title of 'Sound analysis.' These lectures have been rewritten for presentation in book form, and 'The science of musical sounds' has been chosen for the title as giving a better idea of the contents. They appear substantially as delivered, though some slight additions have been made and much explanatory detail regarding the experiments and illustrations has been omitted. The important additions relate to the tuning fork in Lecture II and harmonic analysis in Lecture IV, while two quotations are added in the concluding section of Lecture VIII . A course of scientific lectures designed for the general public must necessarily consist in large part of elementary and well known material, selected and arranged to develop the principal line of thought. It is expected that lectures under the auspices of the Lowell Institute, however elementary their foundation, will present the most recent progress of the science. The explanations of general principles and the accounts of recent researches must be brief and often incomplete; nevertheless it is hoped that the lectures in book form will furnish a useful basis for more extended study, and to further this end they are supplemented by references to sources of additional information. The references are collected in an appendix, citations being made by numbers in the text corresponding to the numbers in the appendix. It is further expected that such lectures will be accompanied by experiments and illustrations to the greatest possible degree; the nature and extent of this illustrative material is shown as well as may be by the aid of diagrams and pictures, nearly all of which have been especially prepared, and much care has been taken to make them as expressive as possible of the original demonstrations and explanations. The methods and instruments used in sound analysis by the author, and many of the results of such work, were described in the lectures in advance of other publication and it is the intention to supplement the brief accounts here given by more detailed reports in scientific journals"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).
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"A series of eight lectures ... given at the Lowell Institute in January and February, 1914, under the general title of 'Sound analysis.' These lectures have been rewritten for presentation in book form." --Pref.

Reprint of 1916.

Includes index.

"References": p. 271-279.

"A series of eight lectures was given at the Lowell Institute in January and February, 1914, under the general title of 'Sound analysis.' These lectures have been rewritten for presentation in book form, and 'The science of musical sounds' has been chosen for the title as giving a better idea of the contents. They appear substantially as delivered, though some slight additions have been made and much explanatory detail regarding the experiments and illustrations has been omitted. The important additions relate to the tuning fork in Lecture II and harmonic analysis in Lecture IV, while two quotations are added in the concluding section of Lecture VIII . A course of scientific lectures designed for the general public must necessarily consist in large part of elementary and well known material, selected and arranged to develop the principal line of thought. It is expected that lectures under the auspices of the Lowell Institute, however elementary their foundation, will present the most recent progress of the science. The explanations of general principles and the accounts of recent researches must be brief and often incomplete; nevertheless it is hoped that the lectures in book form will furnish a useful basis for more extended study, and to further this end they are supplemented by references to sources of additional information. The references are collected in an appendix, citations being made by numbers in the text corresponding to the numbers in the appendix. It is further expected that such lectures will be accompanied by experiments and illustrations to the greatest possible degree; the nature and extent of this illustrative material is shown as well as may be by the aid of diagrams and pictures, nearly all of which have been especially prepared, and much care has been taken to make them as expressive as possible of the original demonstrations and explanations. The methods and instruments used in sound analysis by the author, and many of the results of such work, were described in the lectures in advance of other publication and it is the intention to supplement the brief accounts here given by more detailed reports in scientific journals"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2012. Available via World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2012 dcunns

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