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The problem of mental disorder [electronic resource] : a study / undertaken by the Committee on Psychiatric Investigations, National Research Council, Madison Bentley, chairman.

By: National Research Council (U.S.). Committee on Psychiatric Investigations.
Contributor(s): Bentley, Madison, 1870-1955.
Publisher: New York : McGraw-Hill, 1934Edition: 1st ed.Description: x, 388 p. ; cm.Subject(s): Psychiatry | Mental illness | Psychiatry | Mentally Ill PersonsAdditional physical formats: OriginalDDC classification: 616.8082 Online resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.Summary: "When we consider, on the one hand, the present limitations in psychiatrical knowledge found in most persons devoted to research in the physical, biological, and psychological fields, and, on the other hand, the limitations in scientific training commonly found among professional psychiatrists, we shall not expect too much of a hurried and crude attempt to bring together the field of fundamental knowledge and the field of curative art. But we may reasonably hope to see what scientific support can be brought to light by a first methodical survey and to derive some definite intimation of promise from this quarter. In crises and in the most stubborn problems of living, men still turn naturally to divination, to simple rules and formulas, to superstitions hardened by centuries of tradition, and to creeds and doctrines. In very few of the great human emergencies--possibly only in the issues of death--has the temptation to resort to primitive logic, to magic, and to cultish beliefs been so great as it has been in those dreadful afflictions which alienate and incapacitate the individual. Here the temptation is undoubtedly increased by the stupendous problem of caring for hundreds of thousands of hospitalized patients and for more hundreds of thousands of unhospitalized persons unfit for making their way and their living in the community. The family, the neighborhood, and the state are all desperate. The temptation is still further increased by the failure to educate, train, and professionally equip the army of men and women required to diagnose, classify, segregate, and suitably care for and treat the vast number of disordered in our midst. Now in desperate circumstances and under emergency it is necessary to face the problem in hand, to invent solutions, and to provide adequate knowledge and means of relief. In our present situation, therefore, this may be a suitable occasion to ask--after a full century of the medical conception of 'mental disease'--whether our fundamental knowledge of nature and of man cannot be used in a broader and more effective way to improve our understanding of the disorders and presently to lead to a more effective control"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).
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Includes index.

"When we consider, on the one hand, the present limitations in psychiatrical knowledge found in most persons devoted to research in the physical, biological, and psychological fields, and, on the other hand, the limitations in scientific training commonly found among professional psychiatrists, we shall not expect too much of a hurried and crude attempt to bring together the field of fundamental knowledge and the field of curative art. But we may reasonably hope to see what scientific support can be brought to light by a first methodical survey and to derive some definite intimation of promise from this quarter. In crises and in the most stubborn problems of living, men still turn naturally to divination, to simple rules and formulas, to superstitions hardened by centuries of tradition, and to creeds and doctrines. In very few of the great human emergencies--possibly only in the issues of death--has the temptation to resort to primitive logic, to magic, and to cultish beliefs been so great as it has been in those dreadful afflictions which alienate and incapacitate the individual. Here the temptation is undoubtedly increased by the stupendous problem of caring for hundreds of thousands of hospitalized patients and for more hundreds of thousands of unhospitalized persons unfit for making their way and their living in the community. The family, the neighborhood, and the state are all desperate. The temptation is still further increased by the failure to educate, train, and professionally equip the army of men and women required to diagnose, classify, segregate, and suitably care for and treat the vast number of disordered in our midst. Now in desperate circumstances and under emergency it is necessary to face the problem in hand, to invent solutions, and to provide adequate knowledge and means of relief. In our present situation, therefore, this may be a suitable occasion to ask--after a full century of the medical conception of 'mental disease'--whether our fundamental knowledge of nature and of man cannot be used in a broader and more effective way to improve our understanding of the disorders and presently to lead to a more effective control"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2011. Available via World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2011 dcunns

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