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Industrial psychology [electronic resource].

By: Siegel, Laurence.
Series: Irwin series in management: Publisher: Homewood, Ill. : R.D. Irwin, 1962Description: 414 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.Subject(s): Psychology, Industrial | Psychology, IndustrialAdditional physical formats: OriginalDDC classification: 658.01 Online resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.Summary: "This book is intended primarily for students enrolled in courses variously designated Business Psychology or Industrial Psychology. I am hopeful also that it will prove useful to persons functioning in the field as personnel managers, training directors, etc. My intention has been to provide an overview of industrial psychology broadly conceived. Instead of restricting the scope to personnel problems or management problems, I have organized the content about the three major parties to industrial activity: workers, managers, and consumers. A background in Introductory Psychology will probably prove helpful to the reader but is not indispensable. While preparing the manuscript I have attempted to keep in mind the kind of student likely to enroll in the course. For a few students, this course will be a first contact with an offering in psychology; most will have had a prior course in Introductory Psychology. It has been my experience that both groups benefit when certain "bridges" between the content regarded as general psychology and that as industrial psychology are provided. Such bridges appear at various points in the text: the viewpoint and methods of present-day psychology are presented in the first chapters; certain principles of measurement are discussed in the chapter on testing; pertinent concepts of learning are presented in the training chapter; a discussion of motivation precedes the chapters dealing with job satisfaction and morale. These bridges are relatively brief and are not intended to duplicate the content of an Introductory Psychology course. Rather, they were designed to facilitate the transition from discussions of behavior in general to a discussion of industrial behavior"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).
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Includes indexes.

"This book is intended primarily for students enrolled in courses variously designated Business Psychology or Industrial Psychology. I am hopeful also that it will prove useful to persons functioning in the field as personnel managers, training directors, etc. My intention has been to provide an overview of industrial psychology broadly conceived. Instead of restricting the scope to personnel problems or management problems, I have organized the content about the three major parties to industrial activity: workers, managers, and consumers. A background in Introductory Psychology will probably prove helpful to the reader but is not indispensable. While preparing the manuscript I have attempted to keep in mind the kind of student likely to enroll in the course. For a few students, this course will be a first contact with an offering in psychology; most will have had a prior course in Introductory Psychology. It has been my experience that both groups benefit when certain "bridges" between the content regarded as general psychology and that as industrial psychology are provided. Such bridges appear at various points in the text: the viewpoint and methods of present-day psychology are presented in the first chapters; certain principles of measurement are discussed in the chapter on testing; pertinent concepts of learning are presented in the training chapter; a discussion of motivation precedes the chapters dealing with job satisfaction and morale. These bridges are relatively brief and are not intended to duplicate the content of an Introductory Psychology course. Rather, they were designed to facilitate the transition from discussions of behavior in general to a discussion of industrial behavior"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2011. Available via World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2011 dcunns

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