Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Brainwashing [electronic resource] : the story of men who defied it.

By: Hunter, Edward, 1902-1978.
Publisher: New York : Farrar, Straus and Cudahy, [1956]Description: 310 p. ; 22 cm.Subject(s): Brainwashing | Persuasive CommunicationAdditional physical formats: OriginalOnline resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.Summary: "This book examines the subject of brainwashing. The titles of some of the book's eleven chapters suggests parts of its content: Ivan P. Pavlov, Brainwashing in action, The Negro as P.O.W., Camp life, The independent character, The British in Korea, What brainwashing is, How it can be beat, and, A matter of integrity. The new word "brainwashing" entered our minds and dictionaries in a phenomenally short time. The reason the word was picked up so quickly was that it was not just a clever synonym for something already known, but described a strategy that had yet no name. A vacuum in language existed: no word tied together the various tactics that make up the process. The German-born Sinologue, Max Perleberg, who is fluent in both modern and classical Chinese, told me that the term might well have been derived from the Buddhist expression "heart-washing," which goes back to the time of Mencius. Heart-washing referred to the withdrawal into meditation of a middle-aged man--perhaps weary of worldly cares--living in a bare pavilion in some placid corner of his garden, leaving his offspring to attend to his business. The Free World began to hear strange reports from the communist-operated prisoner-of-war camps in North Korea. Broadcasts were heard in voices recognized as those of normal young men of the American, British, and other U.N. forces. The voices belonged to these men, but the language did not. Pro-communist publications everywhere began to carry purported confessions and grotesquely worded statements said to have been signed by these soldiers in support of whatever propaganda appeal international communism was making at the moment. The free press generally referred briefly to these matters, smelling a rat somewhere, but was confused by the problem of how to handle them. Each editor had to determine for himself, out of his own experience and conscience, whether this material was to be treated as straight news or enemy propaganda." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode Item holds
E-BOOK E-BOOK Tavistock and Portman Library
electronic full-text resource
Psycbooks via EBSCOhost E-BOOK (Browse shelf) Available Shibboleth login
Total holds: 0

"This book examines the subject of brainwashing. The titles of some of the book's eleven chapters suggests parts of its content: Ivan P. Pavlov, Brainwashing in action, The Negro as P.O.W., Camp life, The independent character, The British in Korea, What brainwashing is, How it can be beat, and, A matter of integrity. The new word "brainwashing" entered our minds and dictionaries in a phenomenally short time. The reason the word was picked up so quickly was that it was not just a clever synonym for something already known, but described a strategy that had yet no name. A vacuum in language existed: no word tied together the various tactics that make up the process. The German-born Sinologue, Max Perleberg, who is fluent in both modern and classical Chinese, told me that the term might well have been derived from the Buddhist expression "heart-washing," which goes back to the time of Mencius. Heart-washing referred to the withdrawal into meditation of a middle-aged man--perhaps weary of worldly cares--living in a bare pavilion in some placid corner of his garden, leaving his offspring to attend to his business. The Free World began to hear strange reports from the communist-operated prisoner-of-war camps in North Korea. Broadcasts were heard in voices recognized as those of normal young men of the American, British, and other U.N. forces. The voices belonged to these men, but the language did not. Pro-communist publications everywhere began to carry purported confessions and grotesquely worded statements said to have been signed by these soldiers in support of whatever propaganda appeal international communism was making at the moment. The free press generally referred briefly to these matters, smelling a rat somewhere, but was confused by the problem of how to handle them. Each editor had to determine for himself, out of his own experience and conscience, whether this material was to be treated as straight news or enemy propaganda." (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2011. Available via World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2011 dcunns

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust Library, 120 Belsize Lane, London NW3 5BA.

020 8938 2520
library@tavi-port.ac.uk.
http://library.tavistockandportman.ac.uk
Moodle

//