Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Lectures on metaphysics. Vol. 1 [electronic resource].

By: Hamilton, William, Sir, 1788-1856.
Contributor(s): Mansel, Henry Longueville | Veitch, John, 1829-1894.
Series: Lectures on metaphysics and logic: Publisher: Edinburgh : William Blackwood and Sons, 1869Edition: 4th ed.Description: xix, 444 p. ; cm.Subject(s): Metaphysics | Logic | Metaphysics | LogicAdditional physical formats: OriginalOnline resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.Summary: "The following Lectures on Metaphysics constitute the first portion of the Biennial Course which the author was in the habit of delivering during the period of his occupation of the Chair of Logic and Metaphysics in the University of Edinburgh. The Author himself, adopting the Kantian division of the mental faculties into those of Knowledge, Feeling, and Conation, considers the Philosophy of Mind as comprehending, in relation to each of these, the three great subdivisions of Psychology, or the Science of the Phenomena of Mind; Nomology, or the Science of its Laws; and Ontology, or the Science of Results and Inferences. The term Metaphysics, in its strictest sense, is synonymous with the last of these subdivisions; while, in its widest sense, it may be regarded as including the first also,--the second being, in practice at least, if not in scientific accuracy, usually distributed among other departments of Philosophy. The following Lectures cannot be considered as embracing the whole province of Metaphysics in either of the above senses"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved).
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode Item holds
E-BOOK E-BOOK Tavistock and Portman Library
electronic full-text resource
Psycbooks via EBSCOhost E-BOOK (Browse shelf) Not for loan Shibboleth login
Total holds: 0

"The following Lectures on Metaphysics constitute the first portion of the Biennial Course which the author was in the habit of delivering during the period of his occupation of the Chair of Logic and Metaphysics in the University of Edinburgh. The Author himself, adopting the Kantian division of the mental faculties into those of Knowledge, Feeling, and Conation, considers the Philosophy of Mind as comprehending, in relation to each of these, the three great subdivisions of Psychology, or the Science of the Phenomena of Mind; Nomology, or the Science of its Laws; and Ontology, or the Science of Results and Inferences. The term Metaphysics, in its strictest sense, is synonymous with the last of these subdivisions; while, in its widest sense, it may be regarded as including the first also,--the second being, in practice at least, if not in scientific accuracy, usually distributed among other departments of Philosophy. The following Lectures cannot be considered as embracing the whole province of Metaphysics in either of the above senses"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved).

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2010. Available via World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2010 dcunns

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust Library, 120 Belsize Lane, London NW3 5BA.

020 8938 2520
library@tavi-port.ac.uk.
http://library.tavistockandportman.ac.uk
Moodle

//