Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Elements of psychology [electronic resource] : an introduction / by Albert Clayton Reid ...

By: Reid, Albert Clayton, 1894-1988.
Series: Prentice-Hall psychology series: Publisher: New York : Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1938Description: xix, 409 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.Subject(s): Psychology | PsychologyAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Elements of psychology.; OriginalDDC classification: 150 | [159.9] Online resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.Summary: "The first psychology laboratory was established only sixty years ago. Hence, the science of psychology is filled with the imperfections of method and the inadequate statements of fact common to any immature science. The present number of psychology laboratories is large; the amount of experimental work is enormous; the published reports of experimental investigations fill volumes. Nevertheless, psychologists in general as yet have adopted no common point of view, and they have formulated no laws that are comprehensive and satisfactory. Such conditions offer attractions, as well as handicaps, to introductory students and to mature investigators. Moreover, psychology suffers from the evils of current popularity. The public uses the word "psychology" indiscriminately; writers have commercialized the superficial interest exhibited by the public; and charlatans have abused and discredited psychology in the opinion of many intelligent people. The vast majority of students, as a consequence, begin the study of psychology under the unfortunate misapprehension that they know something about die field; they are unwittingly embarrassed by prejudice or by the confidence of ignorance. The present book is based on lectures prepared for the introductory student only. They were designed to give him a sound conception of experimental psychology and to prepare him for advanced work in the field. To this end, a general simplicity of style and treatment has been maintained. Numerous technical facts and discussions have been omitted in order to prevent the student from becoming confused by details. These details may be supplied, if the instructor wishes, by reference to the many excellent books listed in the bibliography"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Notes Date due Barcode Item holds
E-BOOK E-BOOK Tavistock and Portman Library
electronic full-text resource
Psycbooks via EBSCOhost E-BOOK (Browse shelf) Not for loan Shibboleth login
Total holds: 0

Includes index.

"References" at end of each chapter; "General bibliography": p. 381-385.

"The first psychology laboratory was established only sixty years ago. Hence, the science of psychology is filled with the imperfections of method and the inadequate statements of fact common to any immature science. The present number of psychology laboratories is large; the amount of experimental work is enormous; the published reports of experimental investigations fill volumes. Nevertheless, psychologists in general as yet have adopted no common point of view, and they have formulated no laws that are comprehensive and satisfactory. Such conditions offer attractions, as well as handicaps, to introductory students and to mature investigators. Moreover, psychology suffers from the evils of current popularity. The public uses the word "psychology" indiscriminately; writers have commercialized the superficial interest exhibited by the public; and charlatans have abused and discredited psychology in the opinion of many intelligent people. The vast majority of students, as a consequence, begin the study of psychology under the unfortunate misapprehension that they know something about die field; they are unwittingly embarrassed by prejudice or by the confidence of ignorance. The present book is based on lectures prepared for the introductory student only. They were designed to give him a sound conception of experimental psychology and to prepare him for advanced work in the field. To this end, a general simplicity of style and treatment has been maintained. Numerous technical facts and discussions have been omitted in order to prevent the student from becoming confused by details. These details may be supplied, if the instructor wishes, by reference to the many excellent books listed in the bibliography"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2010. Available via World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2010 dcunns

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust Library, 120 Belsize Lane, London NW3 5BA.

020 8938 2520
library@tavi-port.ac.uk.
http://library.tavistockandportman.ac.uk
Moodle

//