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Liberty and necessity [electronic resource] : in which are considered the laws of association of ideas, the meaning of the word will, and the true intent of punishment / by Henry Carleton.

By: Carleton, Henry, 1785-1863.
Publisher: Philadelphia : Parry and McMillan, 1857Description: xii, [9]-165 p. ; 19 cm.Subject(s): Free will and determinism | Association of ideas | Punishment | Personal Autonomy | PunishmentAdditional physical formats: OriginalOnline resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.Summary: "I do not pretend to have discovered what was not known before. My aim has been to direct attention to truths we already possess: and if, as I trust it shall appear, that all phenomena of mind are so many facts; that ideas act upon the mind, and not the mind upon ideas; that all their combinations are formed by their own laws of aggregation, and that the mind cannot command or originate an idea for itself, then all further doubt upon the question of liberty and necessity must cease. If in the following pages I have necessarily employed the term will in the sense in which it is used by writers and in common speech, it was that I might show that the true causes of action existed independently of its agency"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).
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"I do not pretend to have discovered what was not known before. My aim has been to direct attention to truths we already possess: and if, as I trust it shall appear, that all phenomena of mind are so many facts; that ideas act upon the mind, and not the mind upon ideas; that all their combinations are formed by their own laws of aggregation, and that the mind cannot command or originate an idea for itself, then all further doubt upon the question of liberty and necessity must cease. If in the following pages I have necessarily employed the term will in the sense in which it is used by writers and in common speech, it was that I might show that the true causes of action existed independently of its agency"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2010. Available via World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2010 dcunns

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