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The psychodynamics of abnormal behavior [electronic resource] / by J.F. Brown ; with the collaboration of Karl A. Menninger.

By: Brown, Junius Flagg, 1902-.
Contributor(s): Menninger, Karl A. (Karl Augustus), 1893-1990.
Series: McGraw-Hill publications in psychology.Publisher: New York ; London : McGraw-Hill Book Company, inc., 1940Edition: 1st ed.Description: xvi, 484 p. : ill., diagrs. ; 24 cm.Subject(s): Psychology, Pathological | Pathologic Processes -- psychologyAdditional physical formats: OriginalDDC classification: 132 | [159.97] Online resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.Summary: "In the brief period of a half century psychopathology, the study of isolated symptoms collected into a sort of curiosity cabinet labeled "The Morbid and Abnormal," has changed into psychodynamics, the study of the integration and disintegration of the human personality. From the few incomplete descriptions of bizarre behavior which characterized the earlier writings on the subject, we have arrived today at the beginnings of a systematized dynamic science. To be sure we are only at the beginning, but I believe that the time has come to incorporate these systematic aspects in the textbook literature. It is one of the chief shortcomings of textbooks that they are seldom abreast of the times. I have tried to make this one up to date by adopting the organismic solution to the psychosomatic problem and by treating each behavior disorder systematically in terms of its cause, significance, and economy. So far as I know, no such treatment exists in the textbook literature. By taking the organismic viewpoint of the mind-body problem as a starting point, much space can be saved, which previously would have been spent in debating the organic versus the functional viewpoint. The structure of the book falls into five independent but closely related parts. A brief introductory section, "The Organismic Viewpoint," establishes the methodological basis of the book. The section that follows is "Symptomatology". The third section, "Theory of the Structure and Genesis of the Personality," attempts a presentation of contemporary psychoanalytic theory which should be adequate for the beginning student. Furthermore, it attempts to present the theory in all its aspects and with all its implications. The ensuing section called "Psychiatry" describes various facts about behavior disorders. The last section examines experimental psychopathology. The book is intended for students of psychology and premedical and medical students. It is based on notes for lectures, and its purpose is hence primarily didactic"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)
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Bibliography: p. 453-470.

"In the brief period of a half century psychopathology, the study of isolated symptoms collected into a sort of curiosity cabinet labeled "The Morbid and Abnormal," has changed into psychodynamics, the study of the integration and disintegration of the human personality. From the few incomplete descriptions of bizarre behavior which characterized the earlier writings on the subject, we have arrived today at the beginnings of a systematized dynamic science. To be sure we are only at the beginning, but I believe that the time has come to incorporate these systematic aspects in the textbook literature. It is one of the chief shortcomings of textbooks that they are seldom abreast of the times. I have tried to make this one up to date by adopting the organismic solution to the psychosomatic problem and by treating each behavior disorder systematically in terms of its cause, significance, and economy. So far as I know, no such treatment exists in the textbook literature. By taking the organismic viewpoint of the mind-body problem as a starting point, much space can be saved, which previously would have been spent in debating the organic versus the functional viewpoint. The structure of the book falls into five independent but closely related parts. A brief introductory section, "The Organismic Viewpoint," establishes the methodological basis of the book. The section that follows is "Symptomatology". The third section, "Theory of the Structure and Genesis of the Personality," attempts a presentation of contemporary psychoanalytic theory which should be adequate for the beginning student. Furthermore, it attempts to present the theory in all its aspects and with all its implications. The ensuing section called "Psychiatry" describes various facts about behavior disorders. The last section examines experimental psychopathology. The book is intended for students of psychology and premedical and medical students. It is based on notes for lectures, and its purpose is hence primarily didactic"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2005. Available via the World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2005 dcunns.

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