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Taxometrics [electronic resource] : toward a new diagnostic scheme for psychopathology / Norman B. Schmidt, Roman Kotov, Thomas E. Joiner.

By: Schmidt, Norman B.
Contributor(s): Kotov, Roman | Joiner, Thomas E.
Publisher: Washington, DC : American Psychological Association, c2004Edition: 1st ed.Description: xi, 198 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.ISBN: 1591471427 (alk. paper).Subject(s): Mental illness -- Classification | Mental illness -- Diagnosis | Mental Health -- classificationAdditional physical formats: No titleDDC classification: 616.89/075 Online resources: Click here to access online | Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.
Contents:
The nature of classification -- Evolution of classification in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: current problems and proposed alternatives -- An analytic primer: how do you do taxometrics? -- Diagnosing a taxon: specific applications for the DSM -- Taxometrics studies of psychopathology: where are the taxa? -- Taxometrics studies of psychopathology: future directions.
Summary: "The purpose of this book is to begin the ambitious task of "true diagnostics," standing on the shoulders of taxometric theory, by reviewing taxometric studies, analyzing several large new data sets, and trusting in the future cooperation and enterprise of psychologists and others who read this book. The book begins with a review of the nature of classification procedures by highlighting some of its main problems and controversies. In chapter 2, the evolution of our current diagnostic system--the DSM--is discussed and the central argument is advanced. The authors suggest that for the DSM to continue to advance, we must begin to scientifically determine the underlying nature of these diagnostic entities through the use of procedures such as taxometrics. Chapter 3 offers a detailed analytic primer on the nature of taxometrics. The primer is written in a user-friendly manner so clinicians and others not familiar with the underlying mathematics associated with taxometrics can gain a full understanding of the importance and utility of these procedures. Chapter 4 is specifically focused on outlining a method by which taxometric procedures can be applied to diagnostic entities within the DSM. The final two chapters provide a review of the current taxometrics literature and the degree to which it has been applied to specific psychopathological entities (e.g., schizophrenia spectrum, anxiety, eating disorders). In summary, this book represents a "call to action" to revolutionize the diagnostic system. The point of this book is not that a diagnostic revolution has occurred; it is that it can and should occur and that, to a degree, it is occurring. Through this book, the authors hope to stimulate this enterprise by describing it, summarizing its initial progress, and contributing toward it. The enterprise, although difficult, is clearly feasible (within years not decades), if a core of psychological scientists join the fray. One of the main purposes of the book is to invite them to contribute to this cause"--Intro. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved)
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 177-189) and index.

The nature of classification -- Evolution of classification in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: current problems and proposed alternatives -- An analytic primer: how do you do taxometrics? -- Diagnosing a taxon: specific applications for the DSM -- Taxometrics studies of psychopathology: where are the taxa? -- Taxometrics studies of psychopathology: future directions.

"The purpose of this book is to begin the ambitious task of "true diagnostics," standing on the shoulders of taxometric theory, by reviewing taxometric studies, analyzing several large new data sets, and trusting in the future cooperation and enterprise of psychologists and others who read this book. The book begins with a review of the nature of classification procedures by highlighting some of its main problems and controversies. In chapter 2, the evolution of our current diagnostic system--the DSM--is discussed and the central argument is advanced. The authors suggest that for the DSM to continue to advance, we must begin to scientifically determine the underlying nature of these diagnostic entities through the use of procedures such as taxometrics. Chapter 3 offers a detailed analytic primer on the nature of taxometrics. The primer is written in a user-friendly manner so clinicians and others not familiar with the underlying mathematics associated with taxometrics can gain a full understanding of the importance and utility of these procedures. Chapter 4 is specifically focused on outlining a method by which taxometric procedures can be applied to diagnostic entities within the DSM. The final two chapters provide a review of the current taxometrics literature and the degree to which it has been applied to specific psychopathological entities (e.g., schizophrenia spectrum, anxiety, eating disorders). In summary, this book represents a "call to action" to revolutionize the diagnostic system. The point of this book is not that a diagnostic revolution has occurred; it is that it can and should occur and that, to a degree, it is occurring. Through this book, the authors hope to stimulate this enterprise by describing it, summarizing its initial progress, and contributing toward it. The enterprise, although difficult, is clearly feasible (within years not decades), if a core of psychological scientists join the fray. One of the main purposes of the book is to invite them to contribute to this cause"--Intro. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved)

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2005. Available via the World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2005 dcunns.

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