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Diagnostic psychological testing. Vol. 1 [electronic resource] / by David Rapaport, with the collaboration of Merton M. Gill, and Roy Schafer.

By: Rapaport, David.
Contributor(s): Schafer, Roy [joint author.] | Gill, Merton Max, 1914- [joint author.].
Series: Publisher: Chicago : The Year book publishers, inc., 1945Description: xi, 573 : ill. ; 24 cm.Subject(s): Mental tests | Nervous system -- Diseases -- Diagnosis | Intelligence Tests | Nervous SystemAdditional physical formats: No titleOnline resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.Summary: "The material presented here is the outgrowth of cooperation of clinical psychologists and psychiatrists over several years. It is intended to be a factual summary of the concentrated use of the most recent and most advanced testing procedures which psychology has to offer clinical psychiatric work. It is hoped it will represent a step forward in the systematization of those principles of the psychology of thinking which are part of the necessary background to a proper qualitative evaluation of these tests. Our aims have been four-fold: 1. We have attempted to show how the tests were welded in our clinical work into a single diagnostic tool. 2. We have attempted to validate those of the tests which have already been put to general clinical psychological use, but for which no systematic clinical validation has been offered in the past; and to develop into easily handled diagnostic indicators some of their neglected characteristics, which have been found useful in our clinical work and experience. 3. We have attempted to put to general use some of these tests which were hitherto used only in the study of specific groups of cases. With these tests our effort was to develop them into tests of general diagnostic use by designing and validating new scoring and new interpretation criteria. 4. We have attempted to develop a psychological rationale for each of these tests and for the different types of responses on them; because without such a rationale the tests and test results must remain meaningless to the psychiatrist, and a matter of automatic procedure and mechanical comparison to the clinical psychologist. The research population included clients with schizophrenia, preschizophrenia, paranoia, depression and neurosis--Intro. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved)
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Bibliography: v. 1, p. 485-486; v. 2, p. 467-469.

"The material presented here is the outgrowth of cooperation of clinical psychologists and psychiatrists over several years. It is intended to be a factual summary of the concentrated use of the most recent and most advanced testing procedures which psychology has to offer clinical psychiatric work. It is hoped it will represent a step forward in the systematization of those principles of the psychology of thinking which are part of the necessary background to a proper qualitative evaluation of these tests. Our aims have been four-fold: 1. We have attempted to show how the tests were welded in our clinical work into a single diagnostic tool. 2. We have attempted to validate those of the tests which have already been put to general clinical psychological use, but for which no systematic clinical validation has been offered in the past; and to develop into easily handled diagnostic indicators some of their neglected characteristics, which have been found useful in our clinical work and experience. 3. We have attempted to put to general use some of these tests which were hitherto used only in the study of specific groups of cases. With these tests our effort was to develop them into tests of general diagnostic use by designing and validating new scoring and new interpretation criteria. 4. We have attempted to develop a psychological rationale for each of these tests and for the different types of responses on them; because without such a rationale the tests and test results must remain meaningless to the psychiatrist, and a matter of automatic procedure and mechanical comparison to the clinical psychologist. The research population included clients with schizophrenia, preschizophrenia, paranoia, depression and neurosis--Intro. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2005 APA, all rights reserved)

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2005. Available via the World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2005 dcunns.

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