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Foundations of psychology [electronic resource] / edited by Edwin Garrigues Boring, Herbert Sydney Langfeld and Harry Porter Weld.

Contributor(s): Boring, Edwin Garrigues, 1886-1968 [ed.] | Langfeld, Herbert Sidney, b. 1879 [ed.] | Weld, Harry Porter [ed.].
Series: Wiley publications in psychology. Publisher: Hoboken, NJ : John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 1948, repr. 1956Description: xv, 631 p. ; cm.Subject(s): Psychology -- Textbooks | Psychology -- TextbooksAdditional physical formats: OriginalOnline resources: Fulltext available via EBSCOhost - Shibboleth login required Also issued in print.Summary: "The strongest evidence of the rapid advance of psychology is the need of frequent revisions of textbooks. It is nine years since our last book, Introduction to Psychology, was published. In the meantime we have had a long war and a victory which psychological research helped attain. In this wartime research much new and valuable knowledge came into being. In addition there has been the more normal acquisition of facts as well as a clearly distinguishable change in point of view. This advance in our science had to be covered in a revision, but we soon found that instead of a revision we were going to have a book so nearly new that it needed a new title. To describe in detail the changes in this book over the last would be to describe a large part of its contents. We must confine ourselves to indicating a few of the more significant differences. It is about twice as large as the Introduction of 1939. Approximately 80 per cent of the material is either new or freshly described. What has been taken from the previous book has been re-edited. There are eighteen contributors, of whom fifteen are new. A number of new chapters have been added, two of which introduce the student to problems of personal adjustment. Some of the material of the old chapters has been differently distributed among the chapters of this book. Some of the topics have been given more detailed treatment; no material of importance has been omitted. There are also a large number of new illustrations, and many of the old ones have been redrawn. In selecting the illustrations we have intended to include only those which we feel would help the student to understand the text. The order of the chapters is completely changed. In 1948 the important thing about the organism is not that it is conscious, but that it reacts to stimulation. So we are having the book start with response--its nature, its mechanics, its maturation, its dependence on motive. After that the student is prepared to study learning as change in the organism's response repertoire, and then perception as a form of the organism's adjustment to its physical environment. Such an approach leads on naturally to the study of the facts of individual difference, to the problems of human efficiency and personal adjustment, and finally to the understanding of attitudes and social relations"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)
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Includes index.

"The strongest evidence of the rapid advance of psychology is the need of frequent revisions of textbooks. It is nine years since our last book, Introduction to Psychology, was published. In the meantime we have had a long war and a victory which psychological research helped attain. In this wartime research much new and valuable knowledge came into being. In addition there has been the more normal acquisition of facts as well as a clearly distinguishable change in point of view. This advance in our science had to be covered in a revision, but we soon found that instead of a revision we were going to have a book so nearly new that it needed a new title. To describe in detail the changes in this book over the last would be to describe a large part of its contents. We must confine ourselves to indicating a few of the more significant differences. It is about twice as large as the Introduction of 1939. Approximately 80 per cent of the material is either new or freshly described. What has been taken from the previous book has been re-edited. There are eighteen contributors, of whom fifteen are new. A number of new chapters have been added, two of which introduce the student to problems of personal adjustment. Some of the material of the old chapters has been differently distributed among the chapters of this book. Some of the topics have been given more detailed treatment; no material of importance has been omitted. There are also a large number of new illustrations, and many of the old ones have been redrawn. In selecting the illustrations we have intended to include only those which we feel would help the student to understand the text. The order of the chapters is completely changed. In 1948 the important thing about the organism is not that it is conscious, but that it reacts to stimulation. So we are having the book start with response--its nature, its mechanics, its maturation, its dependence on motive. After that the student is prepared to study learning as change in the organism's response repertoire, and then perception as a form of the organism's adjustment to its physical environment. Such an approach leads on naturally to the study of the facts of individual difference, to the problems of human efficiency and personal adjustment, and finally to the understanding of attitudes and social relations"--Preface. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved)

Also issued in print.

Electronic reproduction. Washington, D.C. : American Psychological Association, 2005. Available via the World Wide Web. Access limited by licensing agreement. s2005 dcunns.

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